Adrienne Surprenant -
- Adrienne Surprenant - 01/11/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Kids play next to a water pond that is behind their house.
01/11/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Kids play next to a water pond that is behind their house.
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- Adrienne Surprenant - 02/11/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Ceremony for Maruf, 8 years old, that died a week ago from dengue, at the Hajrat Shah Ali Bagdadi General Hospital where his mom Meena Begum works. “There was blood coming out of his eyes, his ears, his mouth. Blood, blood, blood,” she recalls painfully. “No father should carry his dead son’s body, and no mother should grieve her child” adds the father. “Nobody should die of this disease, there should be an initiative to cure it as soon as possible.”
02/11/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Ceremony for Maruf, 8 years old, that died a week ago from dengue, at the Hajrat Shah Ali Bagdadi General Hospital where his mom Meena Begum works. “There was blood coming out of his eyes, his ears, his mouth. Blood, blood, blood,” she recalls painfully. “No father should carry his dead son’s body, and no mother should grieve her child” adds the father. “Nobody should die of this disease, there should be an initiative to cure it as soon as possible.”
- Adrienne Surprenant - 01/11/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Meena Begum, Marufs mother, cries on her sofa.
01/11/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Meena Begum, Maruf's mother, cries on her sofa.
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- Adrienne Surprenant - 28/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Sohid Miya, 45, is admitted at the Dhaka Medical Hospital, as the doctors suspect he has dengue. He suffers from stomach pain (which can signal a hemorrhage), vomits and has motion problems. “I don’t have any money left” his wife Shenuwar, 40, says. “I gave it all for the bed and I had spent so much the last three days for the tests.” Their other daughter was hospitalized one floor below for dengue the week before. With their salaries of daily laborer and factory worker combined, they struggle to pay for the baksheesh required although basic public health services are free in Bangladesh.
28/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Sohid Miya, 45, is admitted at the Dhaka Medical Hospital, as the doctors suspect he has dengue. He suffers from stomach pain (which can signal a hemorrhage), vomits and has motion problems. “I don’t have any money left” his wife Shenuwar, 40, says. “I gave it all for the bed and I had spent so much the last three days for the tests.” Their other daughter was hospitalized one floor below for dengue the week before. With their salaries of daily laborer and factory worker combined, they struggle to pay for the baksheesh required although basic public health services are free in Bangladesh.
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- Adrienne Surprenant - 18/10/2018, Naria, Bangladesh — Bangladesh is the country in the world that is most impacted by climate change. The Prime Minister estimates that the country will struggle with 30 million climate migrants by 2050. In 2018, 2km2 of land disappeared in two months in the Padma river, leaving 4200 to 5000 homeless as of the September 15,2018, according to an ACAPS briefing note. Two health clinics and parts of a bazaar have also been destroyed because of the flooding. In the past seven years, 13 km2 of land fell into the Padma River. In the past seven years, 13km2 of land fell into this river, the biggest channel of the Ganges.
18/10/2018, Naria, Bangladesh — Bangladesh is the country in the world that is most impacted by climate change. The Prime Minister estimates that the country will struggle with 30 million climate migrants by 2050. In 2018, 2km2 of land disappeared in two months in the Padma river, leaving 4200 to 5000 homeless as of the September 15,2018, according to an ACAPS briefing note. Two health clinics and parts of a bazaar have also been destroyed because of the flooding. In the past seven years, 13 km2 of land fell into the Padma River. In the past seven years, 13km2 of land fell into this river, the biggest channel of the Ganges.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 19/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Dhaka is the world’s most densely populated city, and 500.000 people come from the country side to this capital every year. The Environmental Justice Foundation reports that the slums population in Bangladesh increased by 60% in 17 years. From 2000 to 2009, 91% of Bangladesh’s dengue cases were reported in the capital. It is often referred at as an “urban virus” developing more quickly in overcrowded environments.
19/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Dhaka is the world’s most densely populated city, and 500.000 people come from the country side to this capital every year. The Environmental Justice Foundation reports that the slums population in Bangladesh increased by 60% in 17 years. From 2000 to 2009, 91% of Bangladesh’s dengue cases were reported in the capital. It is often referred at as an “urban virus” developing more quickly in overcrowded environments.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 27/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Khokon, 28, sleeps under a mosquito net in his boat parked at Keramiganj Port, by the side of the Buringanga River. He has been making people cross the river on a rented boat for the past 16 years. He rents this boat that is also his home 100 TK (USD 1,20) a day.
27/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—Khokon, 28, sleeps under a mosquito net in his boat parked at Keramiganj Port, by the side of the Buringanga River. He has been making people cross the river on a rented boat for the past 16 years. He rents this boat that is also his home 100 TK (USD 1,20) a day.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 24/10/2018, Uttara, Bangladesh— A man paid by the city corporation sprays the streets of Uttara, a “model town” in the North suburbs of Dhaka that boomed in the past 20 years. High middle-class neighborhoods are sprayed more often than the poorer areas of the capital but the residents seem unsure of the spraying’s regularity: some say it is done daily, others once a month.
24/10/2018, Uttara, Bangladesh— A man paid by the city corporation sprays the streets of Uttara, a “model town” in the North suburbs of Dhaka that boomed in the past 20 years. High middle-class neighborhoods are sprayed more often than the poorer areas of the capital but the residents seem unsure of the spraying’s regularity: some say it is done daily, others once a month.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 20/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—In Hazaribagh, the most densely populated neighborhood of Dhaka, children play in a stagnant water pond let by construction workers. The mosquito vectors of dengue, Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Albopictus, breed in this type of small stagnant water source.
20/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—In Hazaribagh, the most densely populated neighborhood of Dhaka, children play in a stagnant water pond let by construction workers. The mosquito vectors of dengue, Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Albopictus, breed in this type of small stagnant water source.
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- Adrienne Surprenant - 30/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil—Protest from residents of Sao Cristovao, that has been suffering water cuts since three months. One resident collects water drops from his air conditioning machine, others buy water, or collect rain waters. This practice, forced by the poor infrastructures of the City of Rio, can create mosquito breeding spots.
30/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil—Protest from residents of Sao Cristovao, that has been suffering water cuts since three months. One resident collects water drops from his air conditioning machine, others buy water, or collect rain waters. This practice, forced by the poor infrastructures of the City of Rio, can create mosquito breeding spots.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 26/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—People collect water in the Kalsi neighborhood of Dhaka. That slum used to be a refugee camp for Pakistanis during Bangladesh’s independence war. There, they have access to water for two hours twice a day. Water collection, if done carelessly, can create mosquito breeding grounds.
26/10/2018, Dhaka, Bangladesh—People collect water in the Kalsi neighborhood of Dhaka. That slum used to be a refugee camp for Pakistanis during Bangladesh’s independence war. There, they have access to water for two hours twice a day. Water collection, if done carelessly, can create mosquito breeding grounds.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 27/12/2018, Namotomoto (Nadi), Fiji—Ben and Paul burn garbage piles. In Namotomoto village, people have to bring their cans and garbage containing water in the middle of their fields, a couple hundred meters away. There, they used to bury them, but the field filled and the city workers never came to clean the dump. Three years ago, they started burning the piles of waste.
27/12/2018, Namotomoto (Nadi), Fiji—Ben and Paul burn garbage piles. In Namotomoto village, people have to bring their cans and garbage containing water in the middle of their fields, a couple hundred meters away. There, they used to bury them, but the field filled and the city workers never came to clean the dump. Three years ago, they started burning the piles of waste.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 03/12/2018, Saint Paul, La Réunion (France) — A family swims by the Tour des Roches road, where in March 2018, it was “strongly recommended” to not go because of the important presence of Dengue carrying mosquitos. Nearby, the access to Bassin Vital walking road was strictly prohibited.
03/12/2018, Saint Paul, La Réunion (France) — A family swims by the Tour des Roches road, where in March 2018, it was “strongly recommended” to not go because of the important presence of Dengue carrying mosquitos. Nearby, the access to Bassin Vital walking road was strictly prohibited.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 15/11/2018, Saint-Paul, La Réunion (France) — The team from G.L.A.I.V.E, Pierre, Jason, Olivier and Moïse, are collecting waste and “bulks” (refrigerator, washing machine, oven, TV) in a small ravine behind Vinin Aliette’s home. Her husband is sick and she has been trying for five years to get this space cleaned as “mosquitoes come from down there and reach my house,” she says. The association G.L.A.I.V.E provides a free cleaning service to people that are either too old, or living with a handicap and that can’t do it alone. With the beginning of the dengue outbreak, they got a surge in calls.
15/11/2018, Saint-Paul, La Réunion (France) — The team from G.L.A.I.V.E, Pierre, Jason, Olivier and Moïse, are collecting waste and “bulks” (refrigerator, washing machine, oven, TV) in a small ravine behind Vinin Aliette’s home. Her husband is sick and she has been trying for five years to get this space cleaned as “mosquitoes come from down there and reach my house,” she says. The association G.L.A.I.V.E provides a free cleaning service to people that are either too old, or living with a handicap and that can’t do it alone. With the beginning of the dengue outbreak, they got a surge in calls.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 16/11/2018, Piton Saint-Leu, La Réunion (France) — Dominique Tarley, 44 years old, interim with the governmental health agency ARS Indian Ocean, sprays deltaméthrine in gardens of Piton Saint-Leu. A dengue case was confirmed nearby. The ARS sprays small doses of this insecticide in a specific perimeter next to cases, to stop the adult mosquitoes to transmit dengue. They are carefully dosing and testing to avoid creating a resistance to the insecticide amongst the mosquito’s population. The ARS Indian Ocean is a French governmental agency leading the response to epidemics of arboviruses or national notifiable diseases in France overseas territories, such as La Reunion.
16/11/2018, Piton Saint-Leu, La Réunion (France) — Dominique Tarley, 44 years old, interim with the governmental health agency ARS Indian Ocean, sprays deltaméthrine in gardens of Piton Saint-Leu. A dengue case was confirmed nearby. The ARS sprays small doses of this insecticide in a specific perimeter next to cases, to stop the adult mosquitoes to transmit dengue. They are carefully dosing and testing to avoid creating a resistance to the insecticide amongst the mosquito’s population. The ARS Indian Ocean is a French governmental agency leading the response to epidemics of arboviruses or national notifiable diseases in France overseas territories, such as La Reunion.
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- Adrienne Surprenant - 02/01/2019, Suva, Fiji—Nurses at the Civil War Memorial Hospital in Suva. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 70% of the people at risk of dengue reside in the Asia Pacific region. In Fiji, dengue is endemic and almost every year after the cyclone season (January), the island experiences a peak of dengue cases.
02/01/2019, Suva, Fiji—Nurses at the Civil War Memorial Hospital in Suva. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 70% of the people at risk of dengue reside in the Asia Pacific region. In Fiji, dengue is endemic and almost every year after the cyclone season (January), the island experiences a peak of dengue cases.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 03/01/2019, Nadi, Fiji— Dr. Shalvin Chand takes a blood sample to test the platelet levels of Prashant Kumar, 8, at the Nadi Hospital. He has dengue and spent the last four days with very high fever, not eating, not walking. According to his mother Renu, Prashant usually has so much energy he is constantly running around the house, but now, he lost weight. He was going awful, I spent the all the time crying and not sleeping because I was worried he would be hurt says his mother who spend the New Year by her sons bedside. I had dengue before, but it was not as bad as this. It is very dangerous, all the body shakes around. In Fiji, we have it too much.”
03/01/2019, Nadi, Fiji— Dr. Shalvin Chand takes a blood sample to test the platelet levels of Prashant Kumar, 8, at the Nadi Hospital. He has dengue and spent the last four days with very high fever, not eating, not walking. According to his mother Renu, Prashant usually has so much energy he is constantly running around the house, but now, he lost weight. "He was going awful, I spent the all the time crying and not sleeping because I was worried he would be hurt" says his mother who spend the New Year by her son's bedside. "I had dengue before, but it was not as bad as this. It is very dangerous, all the body shakes around. In Fiji, we have it too much.”
- Adrienne Surprenant - 07/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia (France)—Marcel Zeiwe, who has a BAC in science, and Annick Wanaxanng, who has a professional license in agriculture, work since the 5th of December with DASS. They are part of a Pepic program, meant to help workplace insertion and give employment. With the DASS, they go door-to-door in a 100-meter radius around dengue cases. They distribute anti-mosquito spray, and explain to the inhabitants the peak bitting times of the Aedes Aegypti and the means of prevention, warning them that was a case in their close neighbors.
07/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia (France)—Marcel Zeiwe, who has a BAC in science, and Annick Wanaxanng, who has a professional license in agriculture, work since the 5th of December with DASS. They are part of a Pepic program, meant to help workplace insertion and give employment. With the DASS, they go door-to-door in a 100-meter radius around dengue cases. They distribute anti-mosquito spray, and explain to the inhabitants the peak bitting times of the Aedes Aegypti and the means of prevention, warning them that was a case in their close neighbors.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 22/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil—Health vigilance agent, Clodoaldo Pesseira Lima, working for Rio de Janeiro’s prefecture since 15 years, visits residents of the Grande Tijuca neighborhood to detect mosquito breeding spots. He puts larvicide in dangerous ponds of water. He visits the house of José, who says: “I was a military and know they offer us a service, when they arrive uniformed. But many people don’t open their doors by fear.” Both his wife and him once had dengue. This health vigilance service exists since 1903 in Brazil. Agents have to pass every six months in each house that accepts to receive them.
22/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil—Health vigilance agent, Clodoaldo Pesseira Lima, working for Rio de Janeiro’s prefecture since 15 years, visits residents of the Grande Tijuca neighborhood to detect mosquito breeding spots. He puts larvicide in dangerous ponds of water. He visits the house of José, who says: “I was a military and know they offer us a service, when they arrive uniformed. But many people don’t open their doors by fear.” Both his wife and him once had dengue. This health vigilance service exists since 1903 in Brazil. Agents have to pass every six months in each house that accepts to receive them.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 11/12/2018, Saint-Denis, La Réunion (France) — In the airplane between Mauritius and La Reunion, the staff sprays anti-mosquito product before take off. La Reunion uses a different monthly spraying technique and Mauritius slowly transitions towards that.
11/12/2018, Saint-Denis, La Réunion (France) — In the airplane between Mauritius and La Reunion, the staff sprays anti-mosquito product before take off. La Reunion uses a different monthly spraying technique and Mauritius slowly transitions towards that.
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- Adrienne Surprenant - 04/01/2019, Auckland, New Zealand—Brett Thompson and Braeden, health agents at Auckland District Health Board (ADHB) are checking potential mosquito breeding spots around the Port of Auckland Once a month, they survey the whole area to verify there are no habitats for the mosquitoes to lay their eggs. They also place traps to stop the non-indigenous mosquito species from entering the city. The traps also contain the native mosquitoes from embarking boats and serve to collect mosquitoes to identify the types being transported to New Zealand. They go twice a week to inspect the dozens of traps. “The beauty of New Zealand so far is that we still have cold enough winters that don’t allow the mosquitoes to survive,” says Thompson. It is around mid-December that they start catching adult mosquitoes after winter. Once or twice a year, they will catch a dengue vector: Aedes Aegypti. New Zealand has no mosquito vector of dengue, but is surrounded by countries where it is endemic.
04/01/2019, Auckland, New Zealand—Brett Thompson and Braeden, health agents at Auckland District Health Board (ADHB) are checking potential mosquito breeding spots around the Port of Auckland Once a month, they survey the whole area to verify there are no habitats for the mosquitoes to lay their eggs. They also place traps to stop the non-indigenous mosquito species from entering the city. The traps also contain the native mosquitoes from embarking boats and serve to collect mosquitoes to identify the types being transported to New Zealand. They go twice a week to inspect the dozens of traps. “The beauty of New Zealand so far is that we still have cold enough winters that don’t allow the mosquitoes to survive,” says Thompson. It is around mid-December that they start catching adult mosquitoes after winter. Once or twice a year, they will catch a dengue vector: Aedes Aegypti. New Zealand has no mosquito vector of dengue, but is surrounded by countries where it is endemic.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 19/12/2018, Auckland, New Zealand — View of New Zealand from the plane leaving to Samoa.
19/12/2018, Auckland, New Zealand — View of New Zealand from the plane leaving to Samoa.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 23/12/2018, Apia, Samoa—“If 80% of people in Samoa had dengue once, it is that 80% of us like to drink beer outside,” says a woman during her brother’s 50th birthday, as a man lights a coil next to the party. All the family is reunited for the occasion, even the brothers and sisters living abroad in Australia or New Zealand. Their garden is filled with empty coconut shells and other mosquito breeding spots.
23/12/2018, Apia, Samoa—“If 80% of people in Samoa had dengue once, it is that 80% of us like to drink beer outside,” says a woman during her brother’s 50th birthday, as a man lights a coil next to the party. All the family is reunited for the occasion, even the brothers and sisters living abroad in Australia or New Zealand. Their garden is filled with empty coconut shells and other mosquito breeding spots.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 10/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia—Arnaud, the entomologist of DASS, is putting up mosquito traps each week in a plant breeding enterprise close to the airport. He uses the traps to detect if any intrusion of new mosquito species, and monitor the endemic species of mosquitoes present on New Caledonia’s island. He goes there every week, but once a month tours the whole island to do the same. The Aedes Aegypti arrived in New Caledonia around the 1860s but was only detected on the whole territory around a hundred years later. This detection of mosquito is key to follow the International Sanitary rules, to protect the territory and the countries with which it does commerce, or has airplane and boat circulation.
10/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia—Arnaud, the entomologist of DASS, is putting up mosquito traps each week in a plant breeding enterprise close to the airport. He uses the traps to detect if any intrusion of new mosquito species, and monitor the endemic species of mosquitoes present on New Caledonia’s island. He goes there every week, but once a month tours the whole island to do the same. The Aedes Aegypti arrived in New Caledonia around the 1860s but was only detected on the whole territory around a hundred years later. This detection of mosquito is key to follow the International Sanitary rules, to protect the territory and the countries with which it does commerce, or has airplane and boat circulation.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 01/01/2019, Suva, Fiji—Shirya walks behind her house in the Nanuku settlement, during the rain and cyclones season. Shirya and her father Sunil both had dengue for the first time in August 2018. She was hospitalized for four days, but he was kept at the hospital for more than a week. I was very scared,  he recalls.
01/01/2019, Suva, Fiji—Shirya walks behind her house in the Nanuku settlement, during the rain and cyclones season. Shirya and her father Sunil both had dengue for the first time in August 2018. She was hospitalized for four days, but he was kept at the hospital for more than a week. "I was very scared, " he recalls.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 09/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia—The direction of sanitary risks of Nouméa’s town is spraying an insecticide, delatméthrine, in the Vallée des Colons neighborhood. In a perimeter of 100 meters around each confirmed dengue case, they do 3 treatments in 10 days. During the 2018 epidemic, Nouméa deals with 15 to 20 new dengue cases per day. It is the dengue serotype 2 that circulates, a type that hasn’t been on the island since 1998. The younger population not being immune, the epidemic presents a higher risk. Dengue virus has four serotypes, and a second infection from a different type is increasing the risk of severe dengue and hemorrhagic fever.
09/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia—The direction of sanitary risks of Nouméa’s town is spraying an insecticide, delatméthrine, in the Vallée des Colons neighborhood. In a perimeter of 100 meters around each confirmed dengue case, they do 3 treatments in 10 days. During the 2018 epidemic, Nouméa deals with 15 to 20 new dengue cases per day. It is the dengue serotype 2 that circulates, a type that hasn’t been on the island since 1998. The younger population not being immune, the epidemic presents a higher risk. Dengue virus has four serotypes, and a second infection from a different type is increasing the risk of severe dengue and hemorrhagic fever.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 28/04/2019. Petite Isle, La Réunion (France) - Jimmy Hoareau, beekeeper, reportedly lost 85 of his hives due to mosquito control by the ARS about 50 metres from his bees. The problem is that the products used do not only kill mosquitoes. Wildlife renewal takes time. Many people say that two weeks after the LRA they have more mosquitoes because all their predators are dead too. We are told that this is a case of necessity, that there are deaths and that action must be taken, but I do not understand why in agriculture we are trying to reduce the use of insecticides when they are spraying everywhere. We are told that we must choose life or dengue fever, but there must be other solutions. There are researchers who have salaries for this, he says
28/04/2019. Petite Isle, La Réunion (France) - Jimmy Hoareau, beekeeper, reportedly lost 85 of his hives due to mosquito control by the ARS about 50 metres from his bees. "The problem is that the products used do not only kill mosquitoes. Wildlife renewal takes time. Many people say that two weeks after the LRA they have more mosquitoes because all their predators are dead too. We are told that this is a case of necessity, that there are deaths and that action must be taken, but I do not understand why in agriculture we are trying to reduce the use of insecticides when they are spraying everywhere. We are told that we must choose life or dengue fever, but there must be other solutions. There are researchers who have salaries for this," he says
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- Adrienne Surprenant - 10/12/2018, Saint-Paul, La Réunion (France) — Mosquitos have been collected in Sainte-Clothilde, then marked and thrown back where they came from. Collection spots have been installed nearby to verify how far they were traveling and estimate the potential of the Sterile Insect Technique (IST). At the Institut de Recherche et de Développement (IRD) in Saint-Denis, they are developing the Sterile Insect technique, genetically modifying male mosquitos so they become sterile and the female produces useless eggs. They have finished all the preliminary tests and are only waiting for an authorization from the authorities to be ale to make a first release to determine if the technique is worth mass-producing sterile mosquitos.
10/12/2018, Saint-Paul, La Réunion (France) — Mosquitos have been collected in Sainte-Clothilde, then marked and thrown back where they came from. Collection spots have been installed nearby to verify how far they were traveling and estimate the potential of the Sterile Insect Technique (IST). At the Institut de Recherche et de Développement (IRD) in Saint-Denis, they are developing the Sterile Insect technique, genetically modifying male mosquitos so they become sterile and the female produces useless eggs. They have finished all the preliminary tests and are only waiting for an authorization from the authorities to be ale to make a first release to determine if the technique is worth mass-producing sterile mosquitos.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 18/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil— The World Mosquito Program (WMP) in Brazil produces nearly 2 billion of Wolbachia mosquitos a week in their Rio de Janeiro offices that were inaugurated in August, when the program was prolonged and amplified. The Wolbachia method consists in introducing a bacteria called Wolbachia into Aedes mosquitoes so their capacity to transmit dengue, zika and chikungunya is reduced.
18/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil— The World Mosquito Program (WMP) in Brazil produces nearly 2 billion of Wolbachia mosquitos a week in their Rio de Janeiro offices that were inaugurated in August, when the program was prolonged and amplified. The Wolbachia method consists in introducing a bacteria called Wolbachia into Aedes mosquitoes so their capacity to transmit dengue, zika and chikungunya is reduced.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 02/01/2019, Suva, Fiji—Adi Ravoka, field assistant for the World Mosquito Program, releases Wolbachia mosquitoes in the Nasinu Area of Suva.
02/01/2019, Suva, Fiji—Adi Ravoka, field assistant for the World Mosquito Program, releases Wolbachia mosquitoes in the Nasinu Area of Suva.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 11/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia—Delphine Bettar, Medipole pharmacist and Paul Coulerie, doctor in chemistry and natural substances, are at the early start of research about the papaya leaves. They are looking forward to test the impact of its juice on the rise of platelets. When the platelets count drops, right after the fever phase of dengue, the patient’s organism starts failing. There are no current solutions to platelet drop and there is a possibility that papaya leaves juice helps create platelets or contain the drop. It is used in traditional medicine around South-East Asia and the South Pacific. Delphine and Paul started to research papaya when Delphine got dengue, and someone recommended she tried this as a cure.
11/01/2019, Nouméa, New Caledonia—Delphine Bettar, Medipole pharmacist and Paul Coulerie, doctor in chemistry and natural substances, are at the early start of research about the papaya leaves. They are looking forward to test the impact of its juice on the rise of platelets. When the platelets count drops, right after the fever phase of dengue, the patient’s organism starts failing. There are no current solutions to platelet drop and there is a possibility that papaya leaves juice helps create platelets or contain the drop. It is used in traditional medicine around South-East Asia and the South Pacific. Delphine and Paul started to research papaya when Delphine got dengue, and someone recommended she tried this as a cure.
- Adrienne Surprenant - 23/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil—Micaelly, 11, Rafaella, 6, and Ana Clara, 7, participate to the TV003 dengue vaccine developed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the American Nacional Health Institute (NHI) and the Brazilian governmental research institute Butantan. It’s tested in 17 of the 27 Brazilian states over the course of five years. The last phase of this double-blinded test (even doctors don’t know which patients received a placebo and which had the vaccine) is conducted in Rio, on children. There are currently five vaccines for dengue under development worldwide, two of them (including the TV003) are potential candidates and at the vaccine. Their mother admits she was very scared until the week after, when none of them had problems. Their grandmother remains furious, saying the parents used their children as “guinea pigs.”
23/01/2019, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil—Micaelly, 11, Rafaella, 6, and Ana Clara, 7, participate to the TV003 dengue vaccine developed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the American Nacional Health Institute (NHI) and the Brazilian governmental research institute Butantan. It’s tested in 17 of the 27 Brazilian states over the course of five years. The last phase of this double-blinded test (even doctors don’t know which patients received a placebo and which had the vaccine) is conducted in Rio, on children. There are currently five vaccines for dengue under development worldwide, two of them (including the TV003) are potential candidates and at the vaccine. Their mother admits she was very scared until the week after, when none of them had problems. Their grandmother remains furious, saying the parents used their children as “guinea pigs.”
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